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Forecast for summer employment

ALBANY -- Graduation season is on the way and more high-school and college students will be looking for jobs.  More jobs may be available, but it's still an uphill climb to get to the boss' door for an interview because of the number of people climbing that job ladder with you.

"Right now is the right time," said Jan Hennessy, senior program director for the New York Association of Training and Employment Professionals.  If you're working to find a summer job, the experts say you've got to get it now.

Hennessy suspects there are less jobs available at this time, "because of the competition of people who have actually lost their jobs over the past ten years," she said.  It's one reason Hennessy believes contributes to a a high youth unemployment rate. 

"Often times the college students coming back from college have a leg up on the high-school kids," said Dr. Dean Skarlis, College Advisor of New York.  "They're finishing college April or May."

There are indications, however, that there could be a turn-around.  One job firm leans on federal labor statistics that show growth close to thirty percent in the number of summer jobs available for teens in 2012 from the year prior.  The best advice is simple for job-seekers from NYATEP, which works with 560 employers statewide.

"Go out and hand in their resumes," Hennessy said.  "Be personable.  Follow up.  Just keep following up because you're one of many who are looking for that job."

Skarlis believes an upward trend should continue.  "By all accounts the markets are back the job market is coming back, the housing market is slowly coming back so I think it's an optimistic view at least over the next several years," he said.

But the National Association of Colleges and Employers reports only a two-percent increase in new grad hires this year than last year.  The overall numbers for all degree-holders is better, according to Skarlis.

"The unemployment rate for those people who have Bachelor's Degree is only 3.7 percent right now," Skarlis said.  "For those who have no college and just a high-school diploma, the unemployment rate is about 8.1 percent.  It definitely pays to get that four-year degree."

Jobs that you should consider leaving school -- or if you're trying to pick the right degree, "fields in math and science are areas that are much more attractive and pay a lot better," Skarlis said.

Average starting salaries are expected to rise five percent from last year to nearly $45,000, according to data released from the NACE.
 
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